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The Basics of Parental Leave

 

The most challenging part of parental leave is coming back. Being away from work is manageable, so we want to make sure we help you figure out how to get back to work after a few months of parent-child bonding time. We advise being as prepared as possible prior to taking your leave. 

We’ve highlighted our top picks for the most important aspects of a Return to Work program, and the things we suggest companies do for their employees.

We encourage you to bring this list to your HR rep for support in any program creation that doesn’t already.

 

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Talk about leave policy and pay.

HR Teams: Teach parents how leave policy and pay works. For example, the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) is difficult to understand. Share helpful resources with employees. Schedule 1:1 assistance with employees to talk about policy and pay. If your company is overburdened with a small benefits and compensation team, schedule open monthly or quarterly meet ups to talk about it. 

Employees: Talk to HR to learn and fully grasp how much time you’re offered and how much pay you will receive during your leave as soon as you announce your start-date. Here are some resources to better understand FMLA.

Introduce a PRG with a mentorship system.

HR Teams: Create a voluntary mentorship program so that you can pair off previous parents who left the company and returned from leave with parents who are soon to go out on leave. The new parent can seek advice from the parent who has since returned.

Employees: Mentorship systems are great guidance and advice tools. You can talk comfortably to someone who has already been through it.

Implementing a Parent Employee Resource Group (PRG) and establishing a mentorship system within the PRG creates a secure and trusted network of parents. Parents tend to refer trusted sitters, nannies, and adult aides through these groups as well. This is an innovative resource for companies that don’t already offer them.

Get expert help.

Core Care, one of our most successful programs, allows you to plan for your return to work as soon as you go out on leave. Our Return to Work aspect of Core Care serves as a 1:1 concierge and consulting solution for securing a desired daycare or nanny. With our database of national in-home and onsite daycares and our expertise in nanny screening and payroll assistance, our team helps ease finding care. Because most American cities are classified as child care deserts, with an imbalance of supply and demand, solidifying primary care may require many months of prep. We specialize in supporting new parents as we know how overwhelming it can feel the first time. Let us help you source the perfect match for you and your family.

Remember to bring this list to your HR to see if your employer can set up programs like these.